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The Black Hmong and Red Dzao people who predominate here are no exception; Sapa’s tourism explosion has engendered a new normal of interacting with outsiders, leaving minorities perhaps even more exposed.

I caught wind of what was happening in Sapa in late 2012.

Phil Hoolihan, manager of the H’mong Sapa Hotel, told me how one of his staffers, a 16-year-old Black Hmong girl, tried to kill herself after her parents ordered her to marry someone she didn’t love.

She already had a boyfriend, but he couldn’t afford the dowry — about

The Black Hmong and Red Dzao people who predominate here are no exception; Sapa’s tourism explosion has engendered a new normal of interacting with outsiders, leaving minorities perhaps even more exposed.I caught wind of what was happening in Sapa in late 2012.Phil Hoolihan, manager of the H’mong Sapa Hotel, told me how one of his staffers, a 16-year-old Black Hmong girl, tried to kill herself after her parents ordered her to marry someone she didn’t love.She already had a boyfriend, but he couldn’t afford the dowry — about $1,500, the price of a water buffalo — and the father said she had no choice. “But it just seems like almost a part of life here that it’s not that shocking, not something people are still talking about today.” Those two never returned.“You must be very careful.” The students drew the pictures in May 2012, shortly before participating in a made-for-TV documentary by MTV Exit, an initiative that campaigns to end human trafficking.

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The Black Hmong and Red Dzao people who predominate here are no exception; Sapa’s tourism explosion has engendered a new normal of interacting with outsiders, leaving minorities perhaps even more exposed.

I caught wind of what was happening in Sapa in late 2012.

Phil Hoolihan, manager of the H’mong Sapa Hotel, told me how one of his staffers, a 16-year-old Black Hmong girl, tried to kill herself after her parents ordered her to marry someone she didn’t love.

She already had a boyfriend, but he couldn’t afford the dowry — about $1,500, the price of a water buffalo — and the father said she had no choice. “But it just seems like almost a part of life here that it’s not that shocking, not something people are still talking about today.” Those two never returned.

“You must be very careful.” The students drew the pictures in May 2012, shortly before participating in a made-for-TV documentary by MTV Exit, an initiative that campaigns to end human trafficking.

At one point during the program, the members of Canadian pop-punk band Simple Plan sit in a circle with the kids and ask if any of them knows someone who has been trafficked. About a year ago, she says, her cousin boarded the motorbike of a handsome boy whom she trusted. “I dream of her a lot,” Ly says in front of the camera.

“I think they felt life would be tough here, and they didn’t see much hope,” Gilbert said.

,500, the price of a water buffalo — and the father said she had no choice. “But it just seems like almost a part of life here that it’s not that shocking, not something people are still talking about today.” Those two never returned.

“You must be very careful.” The students drew the pictures in May 2012, shortly before participating in a made-for-TV documentary by MTV Exit, an initiative that campaigns to end human trafficking.

At one point during the program, the members of Canadian pop-punk band Simple Plan sit in a circle with the kids and ask if any of them knows someone who has been trafficked. About a year ago, she says, her cousin boarded the motorbike of a handsome boy whom she trusted. “I dream of her a lot,” Ly says in front of the camera.

“I think they felt life would be tough here, and they didn’t see much hope,” Gilbert said.

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Thi’s tale began one day at her room in town, when one of her girlfriends dropped by with a boy she’d just met.

If trafficking happens in pockets, though, Sapa is unique, for in few places is the world changing so quickly as at this outpost of development in the Himalayas’ eastern extremities, the gateway to northern Vietnam’s hill tribe communities.

While striking in variety and interest, not least for their famously vibrant traditional forms of dress, these groups are by and large impoverished, uneducated and disconnected from the protections of the state, heightening their vulnerability to predators.

“So she ate the poison leaf,” Hoolihan said, and he meant it literally. “It was her escape method.” During the period in which Sapa O’Chau lost its three students, Gilbert had been running a tour guide class; the first two girls, the ones who set off together, were enrolled. But the third girl, Thi, actually made it back to Sapa. But everyone knew she had resumed her job as a tour guide, the one she had held before she left town about a year earlier. Thi had attended his class, but she dropped out because she couldn’t deal with the rules or keep from fighting with the other kids. He hadn’t talked to any of the ones who had returned about China. “I don’t want to stress them out.” I met someone who offered to introduce me to Thi, and she and I sat down one afternoon in the town square.

(The names of some of the girls have been changed.) It was a cool, clear October day, free of the dense flash fog that can sweep in so suddenly and obscure this place.

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